20 8 / 2014

austinkleon:

Contact Sheets

After seeing Vivian Maier’s film rolls, I’ve been pawing around online, looking at other photographer’s contact sheets. (The biggest treasure trove is this book of Magnum Contact Sheets — and several of the sheets above came from the site Chasing Light.)

What is a contact sheet?

The contact sheet, a direct print of a roll or sequence of negatives, is the photographer’s first look at what he or she has captured on film, and provides a uniquely intimate glimpse into their working process. It records each step on the route to arriving at an image—providing a rare behind-the-scenes sense of walking alongside the photographer and seeing through their eyes.

Going behind-the-scenes sort of breaks the mythology of photography:

No document gives greater insight into how a photographer shoots and edits than a contact sheet—the direct print, from a roll or negatives, where a film photographer often first sees her work, grease pencil in hand, and marks her best frames. […] “The contact sheet spares neither the viewer nor the photographer,” Martine Franck writes… “By publishing that which is most intimate, I am taking the very real risk of breaking the spell, of destroying a certain mystery.”

Photographers, of course, don’t always like the evidence of their process:

“It’s generally rather depressing to look at my contacts,” Elliott Erwitt [says.] “One always has great expectations, and they’re not always fulfilled.” Henri Cartier-­Bresson, a Magnum founder, so hated the idea of someone pawing through his outtakes that he once bragged about throwing out his negatives “in the same way as one cuts one’s nails.”

And in the digital age, of course, contact sheets don’t really exist…

Related reading: 10 Things Street Photographers Can Learn From Magnum Contact Sheets

20 8 / 2014

Too soon. (at Kroger)

20 8 / 2014

(Source: Spotify)

20 8 / 2014

I have to call a Ms. Kuntz, and tell her that her photos are ready.

UPDATE: She was kind enough to give her first name on her outgoing message. I went that route, as I would rather risk overfamiliarity than mispronunciation.

19 8 / 2014

micdotcom:

Listen to ‘SNL’ announcer Don Pardo report the news of JFK’s assassination on NBC  

Don Pardo, one of TV’s most identifiable voices, passed away Monday night at the age of 96.

Pardo had a six-decade career in television announcing and voice work, with a voice most recognizable for introducing every episode of Saturday Night Live with a booming “It’s Saturday Night Live,” followed by a listing of the show’s players. “Nothing is like the moment when Don Pardo says your name,” former cast member Jimmy Fallon said in a 2010 interview with the New York Times.

His career began in radio |Follow micdotcom

19 8 / 2014

exhibition-ism:

"Moon" by SpY in Lausanne, Switzerland.

19 8 / 2014

"I love kissing. If I could kiss all day, I would. I can’t stop thinking about kissing. I like kissing more than sex because there’s no end to it. You can kiss forever. You can kiss yourself into oblivion. You can kiss all over the body. You can kiss yourself to sleep. And when you wake up, you can’t stop thinking about kissing. Dammit, I can’t get anything done because I’m so busy thinking about kissing. Kissing is madness! But it’s absolute paradise, if you can find a good kisser."

Sufjan Stevens (via moonpunx)

19 8 / 2014

One more from the fair: behold, the fried Hot Brown on a stick. Far better than it had any right to be. Still, glad I didn’t have to eat it all by myself.

One more from the fair: behold, the fried Hot Brown on a stick. Far better than it had any right to be. Still, glad I didn’t have to eat it all by myself.

19 8 / 2014

I would rather let food sit until it’s near room temperature, or just eat it cold, than deal with what a microwave often does to textures and flavors.

19 8 / 2014

(Source: Spotify)